Library Websites for Genealogy: More Than Just the Catalog

library booksWhen was the last time you visited a public library for your genealogy research?

Think about your answer. Did you think of a time when you walked through their doors? That’s good, but if you think about libraries only as a brick-and-mortar resource for your genealogy, you’re missing a lot. There is a lot more to public library websites than just an online catalog.

Great Things in Small Packages

It’s easy to get excited about websites with billions of records. The more records, the more likely you’ll find something, right?

Honestly, I don’t care how big the database is as long as it has something I need. That’s the cool thing about public library databases. They tend to be focused on a particular area or subject. They might not have the breadth of the big websites, but they take a deeper dive. They uncover resources that are too small or too esoteric to end up on a large commercial site.

Not Just the Big Libraries

When you think about public libraries with great genealogy collections, you probably think about The Genealogy Center at the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, Indiana and the Clayton Library Center in Houston, Texas. They have two of the largest genealogy collections in the U.S. If any library is going to have online databases, it would be them… and they do.

But they aren’t the only public libraries with cool things for us to explore online. Libraries of all sizes are giving us easier access to the materials in their collections. Consider these:

None of those are what you would call huge libraries, but they have great resources that we can use from wherever we connect to the Internet.

Finding the Library and the Genealogy It Has Online

Your favorite search engine can find public libraries quite handily. The challenge is that you might not find all of the ones in the area. In my county, there are 8 different public library systems — and not all of them have the name of their town in it. 

When I want to explore public libraries for an area where my ancestors lived, I look at the website of the county genealogical society and the county’s GenWeb page. They usually have links to the libraries in their county.

Once you find a library you’re interested in, you might need to be creative in looking for its online genealogy resources. Look not only for links to “Genealogy” and “Local History,” but also things like “Resources,” “Research,” “Community,” “Digital Library,” or “Digital Memory.”

Visit Virtually

Going to a library’s website before a visit is an important step in having a successful research trip. But we should also explore these sites even when we aren’t planning on walking through their (physical) doors. We should incorporate public library websites into all of our genealogy research.

What cool things have you found on public library websites?

Library websites for genealogy

Our Military Heritage – An Update

You are probably familiar with the fantastic genealogical collection at the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, Indiana. What you might not be familiar with is their growing collection of databases available on their website.

One section of the website is “Our Military Heritage,” which is a collection of digitized books, photographs, letters, diaries…  anything that pertains to military service. There are resources for military engagements from the colonial wars all the way through the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. I’ve written about this collection before, but my how it has grown!

The World War II collection has some fascinating resources, including four large collections of letters. “Another Side of War: Soldiers Letters to Miss Ann Adang” includes digitized images of the hundreds of letters sent by twelve soldiers to Ann Adang of Fort Wayne. It is very interesting to read the similarities and differences of the soldiers and sailors from different backgrounds serving in different parts of the world. “Letters of Glenn and Ellen Baker and Letters from Home, World War II” includes the letters exchanged between a husband and wife separated by war.

There is an extensive Civil War section, including unit histories, GAR publications, and pension/service records. One of my favorite resources on this site is Woman’s Work in the Civil War: A Record of Heroism, Patriotism and Patience. (In the interest of full disclosure, I should point out that a copy of my senior honors thesis “With Diplomas of Patriotism: African American Civil War Veterans in Ohio” is also available on this site.)

Some of the resources are quite lengthy, while others, such as the WWI military record of Nicholas J. Martin, are a single page.

Printed materials have been run through an OCR program and are full text searchable.

A Way to Honor Your Military Ancestors

The Genealogy Center at the Allen County Public Library offers you the opportunity not only to research your military ancestors, but also to share your military resources. If you would like to contribute letters to and from service personnel, diaries of military ancestors, copies of pension and service records, pictures of medals and citations, discharge papers, military burials and the like, please contact Curt Witcher [CWitcher@ACPL.Info or 260.421.1226] or simply send digital copies of the military documents (scanned at 300 dpi) to:
The Genealogy Center, Attn.: Curt Witcher, Allen County Public Library, 900 Library Plaza, Ft.Wayne, IN 46802.

The Ohio Historical Society has just launched a new website to raise awareness of Ohio’s role in the Civil War: The site features:

  • Digital collections, such as Ohio regimental battle flags
  • A timeline of Civil War events
  • News about upcoming events
  • Discussion forum
  • A section for teachers

I am looking forward to watching this site grow as we get closer to the sesquicentennial in 2011. (Is that really only a little more than a year away?!)

Lincoln Collection at the Allen County Public Library

Ever since the announcement that the documents from the Lincoln Collection at the former Lincoln Museum would move to the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, I’ve been anxious to see just what treasures are in the collection. If the first round of digital images are any indication, the collection is beyond “cool.”

When the Lincoln Museum closed, the Lincoln Financial Foundation gave the artifacts to the Indiana State Museum and the records to the Allen County Public Library. Work has begun on digitizing the records and posting them online. The images that they’ve posted so far are rather tantalizing. My favorite is an undated note written by Lincoln: “Let Master Tad have a Navy sword. A. Lincoln”.

Although not part of the Lincoln Collection, the Genealogy Center at ACPL also has posted an image of a silk ribbon commemorating Lincoln’s death. As they note on the website, it is a rare glimpse into life in Fort Wayne at the time, as the newspapers from April 1865 have been lost.

A recent article in the Journal Gazette has some behind-the-scene photos and more detail about the Lincoln Collection at ACPL. It will be interesting to watch as more and more images are posted on the Lincoln Collection website.

Ohio Tax Records – Digitized and Online for Free

Some Ohio researchers are familiar with FamilySearch’s partnership with the Ohio Genealogical Society to index early Ohio tax records. After countless hundreds of hours of volunteer time, we are seeing the fruits of the labor! The tax records from 1816 – 1838 for Columbiana, Guernsey, Harrison and Jefferson counties are now on the site, fully indexed and linked to the digital image.

Go to, click on the map of the United States, then scroll down to “Ohio Tax Records, 1816-1838.”

Later today, I will work up some more screenshots showing how to navigate the site. Meanwhile, enjoy these early Ohio tax records!


Results for John Ramsey in the Ohio Tax Records on

Results for John Ramsey in the Ohio Tax Records on


Showing an early Ohio tax record on

Showing an early Ohio tax record on

More Records on FamilySearch

According to a press release today from FamilySearch, they’ve added to the records (both indices and images) to the pilot FamilySearch site ( For some time, they’ve had all of the images for the 1850 U.S. census (population schedule). Now the everyname index is 83% complete with the recent addition of Louisiana and Wisconsin. The indexed states are Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Wisconsin and the District of Columbia.

They have also added to the available indexes for the 1850 slave schedules. All of the images for the slave schedules are available for browsing, even for the states that aren’t yet indexed.

It isn’t just U.S. researchers that are benefitting from FamilySearch’s efforts. Among their international records groups are new church records for Mexico, Norway and Spain.

This is such a wonderful time to be a genealogist!

More military resources

From the latest issue of Genealogy Gems, published by the Genealogy Center at the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne:

In the “Our Military Heritage” portion of are the following new resources:

Civil War:
Abstract of General Orders and Proceedings of the 26th Annual Encampment, Department of New York, G.A.R. [Grand Army of the Republic]

Indian Wars:
The Black Hawk War, Including a Review of Black Hawk’s Life

Revolutionary War:
Revolutionary War Veterans Buried in Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio

World War I:
With a Field Ambulance at Ypres, Being Letters Written March 7 – August 15, 1915 by William Boyd

World War II:
The World War II Letters of Maxwell P. Smith

Directories, Yearbooks, and Other General Works:
Names of Invalid Pensioners of the United States Who Have Been Admitted to the Rolls Since March 3, 1849

[NOTE: You can subscribe to “Genealogy Gems,” the free monthly ezine published by the Genealogy Center at the Allen County Public Library by going to and filling out the subscription form at the bottom of the page.]

FamilySearch Indexing and the National Archives

They’re at it again! This time, FamilySearch Indexing has announced a partnership with the National Archives. The press release states:

The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) of the United States and FamilySearch today announced an agreement that will lead to the digitization of millions of historical documents over time. The bulk of the digital images and related indices will be freely accessible through, 4,500 family history centers worldwide, or at the National Archives and its Regional Centers. …

Under the new agreement, FamilySearch will be operating highly specialized digital cameras 5 days a week at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. FamilySearch intends to extend the digitization services to select regional facilities at a later date. That means there will be a continuous flow of new data for genealogy buffs to explore for years to come. It also means FamilySearch will be able to digitize the thousands of microfilms it has already created from NARA’s holdings, providing access to millions of images for genealogists to search from the convenience of their home computers with Internet access.

The first fruit of this effort is a portion of a very large collection of Civil War records, already underway. In this pilot project, FamilySearch will digitize the first 3,150 Civil War widow pension application files (approximately 500,000 pages). After digitization, these historical documents will be indexed and posted online by with the indices also available for free on FamilySearch intends to do all 1,280,000 of these files over the coming years.

It wasn’t too long ago that we never thought we’d see records like these digitized, let alone indexed and online!

FamilySearch Indexing going online

FamilySearch Indexing is an incredible project started by the Family History Library. (Technically, FamilySearch Indexing is part of the FamilySearch. The names do get confusing.) The goal is to digitize the microfilm held in the Granite Mountain Records Vault, index it, and put it online. Just a few years ago, we thought that the microfilm would never be digitized in our lifetimes, let alone indexed and put online!

One of the first major FSI projects was Georgia Death Certificates. I received a press release today saying that the index and the images are now online! They can be accessed at the Georgia State Archives website — (click on “Virtual Vault”) and at

The Ohio Genealogical Society is sponsoring the indexing of early Ohio tax records. I am hopeful that some of the images and data will be online very soon.

If you would like to help out with any of the FamilySearch Indexing projects, visit the site, read about the projects, and follow the instructions for registering to volunteer. You can do it from home and you can do as much or as little as you’d like.

This is a very exciting time to be involved in genealogy!

With the advent of Ken Burns’ new WWII documentary, The War, we are certain to see more and more projects to capture the memories of WWII veterans. When you consider that they are dying at the rate of approximately 1,000 per day, you realize how important it is that we talk to them now. Tomorrow may be too late…

One project is a collaborative effort of the PBS stations in Ohio. They have created a website – – which features videos of interviews with veterans as well as civilians who assisted the war effort from the homefront. There are some truly powerful stories.

If you are a WWII vet or know one, record the stories now. Future generations should know what they did.