Tombstone Tuesday: Modern Woodmen of America

This tombstone in Forest Cemetery, Circleville, Ohio is a great example of the Modern Woodmen of America. Many genealogists and taphophiles are familiar with the Woodmen of the World organization, which placed countless tree-stump tombstones on the graves of its deceased members. The Modern Woodmen of America is older than WOW, though it was founded by the same man, Joseph Cullen Root. He formed MWA in Lyons, Iowa in 1883. He left the organization and formed WOW in Omaha, Nebraska in 1890.

Modern Woodmen of America is still an active fraternal/insurance organization. Today it offers a variety of insurance and financial services. Its website features a timeline of its history.

Rihl tombstone with Modern Woodmen of America logo, Forest Cemetery, Circleville, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, 10 May 2009; all rights reserved.

Rihl tombstone with Modern Woodmen of America logo, Forest Cemetery, Circleville, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, 10 May 2009; all rights reserved.


Close-up of Modern Woodmen of America logo, Rihl tombstone, Forest Cemetery, Circleville, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, 10 May 2009; all rights reserved.

Close-up of Modern Woodmen of America logo, Rihl tombstone, Forest Cemetery, Circleville, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, 10 May 2009; all rights reserved.

Tombstone Tuesday: John Coble, “a lovely bud so young and fair”

John C. Coble tombstone, Asbury Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo taken by Amy Crow 9 June 2009; all rights reserved.

John C. Coble tombstone, Asbury Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo taken by Amy Crow 9 June 2009; all rights reserved.

This tombstone is in Asbury Cemetery in Madison Township, Franklin County, Ohio, near the intersection of Noe-Bixby Road and Winchester Pike. It is in excellent condition. I love the epitaph.

“In
memory of
John C.
Son of John and
Jane Coble.
born Augt 3th 1838.
died Septr. 17th 1840.
aged 2 years,
1 month and 14 days.
This lovely bud so young
and fair,
Called hence by early doom
Just came to show how
sweet a flower
In paradise would bloom.”

Tombstone Tuesday: Springtime in the Cemetery

With all of the snow we’ve had this winter — including 6 inches of snow and a half inch of ice we got yesterday and today — I’m in need of some springtime. I took this photo a couple of years ago at Green Lawn Cemetery in Columbus. I hope it brings a bit of springtime to you, too!

Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, 2 April 2007; all rights reserved.

Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, 2 April 2007; all rights reserved.

Tombstone Tuesday: Need a mirror

When I went to Georgetown, Kentucky back in September 2007, I did what I usually do when I go to a new location: scout out the local cemeteries :) Maplegrove Cemetery in Georgetown is a small, modest, somewhat overgrown cemetery tucked behind a Pizza Hut and a gas station.

This tombstone for Eliza Washington is made from concrete. My best guess is that the person who made it poured the concrete into a box form, then set in stencils for the letters (like kids used to do with potatoes). The tombstone maker forgot (or didn’t realize) that the stencils had to be set backwards so they would appear correctly on the marker. (Again, this is just my best guess.)

I did find a 20-year-old Eliza Washington in the 1910 census for Scott County, Kentucky, but I’m not certain it is the same person.

Text:
Eliza
Washi-
ngton
born
July. 7
184 [9?] 5[?]
died
May. 8
1912

Need a mirror...

Tombstone Tuesday: Indianapolis Typographical Union

Julie Cahill Tarr, the Chicagoland Graveyard Rabbit, posted a photo of  the Chicago Typographical Union Memorial in Elmwood Park Cemetery, River Grove Illinois. It reminded that I found a similar monument a few years ago in Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis, Indiana (one of my favorite cemeteries).

Indianapolis Typographical Union monument, Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Indiana. Photo by Amy Crow, taken 27 September 2004, all rights reserved.

Indianapolis Typographical Union monument, Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Indiana. Photo by Amy Crow, taken 27 September 2004, all rights reserved.

 According to The Encyclopedia of Indianapolis, the National Typographical Union was formed in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1852. Journeymen printers from fourteen cities were represented; the group from Indianapolis was selected as Union No. 1 “through a random drawing.” The Union later became the International Typographical Union following the admission of Canadian unions in 1869.(1)

J. . E. Puhl marker, Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Indiana; photo taken by Amy Crow, 27 Sept 2004, all rights reserved.

J. E. Puhl marker, Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Indiana; photo taken by Amy Crow, 27 Sept 2004, all rights reserved.

Surrounding the monument are 13 smaller markers: (2)

  • S. H. Hill, 1874
  • W. Spooner, 1875
  • Unknown, 1876
  • ___ Lee, 1876
  • C. Gildricht, 1881
  • J. B. Smith, 1880
  • J. Sexton, 1905
  • J. E. Puhl, 1881
  • W. B. Montgomery, 1890
  • J. Wilson, 1885
  • B. E. Dolbear, 1887
  • Mrs. B. E. Dolbear, 1887
  • D. Mitten, 1887

Sources:

(1) Cunningham, Joan. “International Typographical Union.” In The Encyclopedia of Indianapolis, edited by David J. Bodenhamer and Robert Graham Barrows, 823-824. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1994. 

(2) Crow, Amy. Photographs taken at Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Indiana, 27 September 2004.

Tombstone Tuesday: Woody Hayes

In honor of this Saturday’s Ohio State/Michigan game (the greatest rivalry in college football!), I’m featuring the grave of legendary OSU football Woody Hayes. Woody and his wife Anne are buried in Union Cemetery in Columbus, not far from the OSU campus.

Although he will always be known for being the coach of the Buckeyes, Woody was also an incredible history buff. He also served in the U.S. Navy in World War II and left the service with the rank of lieutenant commander. An excellent biography of Woody Hayes can be found on the WOSU-TV website.

 

Wayne Woodrow "Woody" Hayes, Union Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, 29 August 2008, all rights reserved.

Wayne Woodrow (Woody) Hayes, Union Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, 29 August 2008, all rights reserved.

The verse reads:

“And in the night of death, hope sees a star
and listening love hears the rustle of a wing.”

Tombstone Tuesday: Cenotaphs

[Even though it is Wednesday where I am, I’m still calling it “Tombstone Tuesday.” Hey, it’s still Tuesday somewhere in the world!]

Question: When is a tombstone not a tombstone?

Answer: When it’s a cenotaph.

A cenotaph (literally “empty tomb”) is a memorial for someone who is not buried at that place, either because they are buried someplace else or the body could not be recovered. Sometimes the marker will give you a clue that it is a cenotaph rather than a tombstone.

 

George Kruskie, Holy Cross Cemetery, Cross Village Township, Emmet County, Michigan. Photo take by Amy Crow, all rights reserved.

George Kruskie, Holy Cross Cemetery, Cross Village Township, Emmet County, Michigan. Photo taken by Amy Crow, all rights reserved.

The phrase “Lost on Ice” on this marker in Holy Cross Cemetery in Emmet County, Michigan is a clue that George Kruskie is not actually buried here, but rather was lost. The area is on the shores of Lake Michigan and near the Straits of Mackinac. A search for newspaper articles might confirm my hypothesis that he fell through the ice and his body was never recovered.

 

Dorothy Beetham, Union Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo by Amy Johnson Crow, 2008. All rights reserved.

Dorothy Beetham, Union Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo by Amy Johnson Crow, 2008. All rights reserved.

The marker shown above is the first one I have seen that actually notes that it is a cenotaph. It isn’t clear whether it is a cenotaph just for Dorothy Beetham or for all three people listed on the stone. A check with the office at Union Cemetery in Columbus, obituaries, and death certificates would clear up the situation.

Tombstone Tuesday: Daniel Lewis, fireman

Capt. Daniel S. Lewis, Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus. Photograph taken by Amy Crow, August 8, 2008. All rights reserved.

Capt. Daniel S. Lewis, Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus. Photograph taken by Amy Crow, August 8, 2008. All rights reserved.

This impressive monument is in Green Lawn Cemetery in Columbus. The imagery on the stone immediately tell you it is the grave of a firefighter — the hydrant with the hose that outlines the stone, a helmet, a ladder, an axe, and a lantern. The inscription reads:

 

In Memory Of

Capt. Daniel S. Lewis

Born May 15, 1854

Entered the Service

Oct. 18, 1881

Gave his life to the city

April 26, 1903

Lewis, captain of Engine Company No. 11,  was killed fighting a fire in the Brunson and Union Company buildings at the corner of Long Street and High Street in downtown Columbus.  According to a newspaper account, he was killed when a wall collapsed and fell on him. “His body was cremated in the ruins.”

“The fire was attended by many exciting incidents, the most thrilling being the rescue of Philip Nation, a grocer, from his apartments on the fourth floor of the Brunson Building where he had been hemmed in by flames. The fire started in the Brunson Building and its progress was fanned by a brisk wind from the north. This building was occupied on the ground floor by the Walkover Shoe Company, Tallmadge Hardware Company, and Bott Brothers’ saloon. The upper floors were occupied mainly as living apartments, the exceptions being the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union rest room and the art studios of Maurice Hague and H. P. Hayden. 

“Smoke was first seen issuing from the basement under the saloon. The fire smoldered for half an hour and the firemen thought they had it under control, when the flames suddenly burst from an upper story”

Source:

The New York Times, April 27, 1903, p. 1. Available online at http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=940DE5DD1F30E733A25754C2A9629C946297D6CF

I’m amazed and flattered!

 

George Blount, Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio

George Blount, Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio

Back in June when I started Tombstone Tuesday, I had no idea that anyone else would pick up on the idea. Several bloggers have and I am amazed and flattered! These bloggers are also doing their own Tombstone Tuesdays:

 

(If I’ve missed anyone doing Tombstone Tuesday, please let me know!)
I hope everyone has as much fun with their Tombstone Tuesdays as I’ve had with mine!