Celebrate Ohio Statehood Day with These Resources

Today is Ohio Statehood Day. Happy 208th Birthday, Ohio! (You don’t look a day over 207!) What better way to celebrate than by checking out some great resources for Ohio research. Here are some of my favorites, including some that are rather off the beaten path:

  • Ohio Deaths, 1908-1953 at FamilySearch.org. Digital images of death certificates — gotta love ’em. You do need to be logged into FamilySearch to see the images. (Registration is free.)
  • Ohio History Central. An online encyclopedia of Ohio history. Remember — you need to learn the history of an area to begin to understand the people.
  • Ohio Memory. Digital images from collections all across the state.
  • Ohio Cemetery Locations by The Ohio Genealogical Society. The free version gives the township and county. OGS members can log in and get much more detailed information, including GPS coordinates, alternate names, condition, etc.
  • Roster of Ohio Soldiers at OGS’ Ohio Civil War Genealogy Center. This is data from the Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System. However, this search is much more flexible. Unlike the CWSS site, here you can search by Soundex. You can also get an entire regiment or a specific company in a regiment.
  • Remarkable Ohio. Searchable database of more than 1,300 historic markers around the state. They even have an app for iPhone! (I’m still waiting for them to come out with a version for Android.)

There’s an interesting footnote to Ohio Statehood Day. Ohio considers 1 March 1803 to be its “official” statehood date, as that is the date that the state’s General Assembly first met. It’s the date you’ll see listed in virtually every resource. However, there is a pretty convincing argument that statehood day should actually be February 19, 1803, which is when Thomas Jefferson endorsed the legislation approving Ohio’s admission to the Union. What would Ohio be without a little political controversy? :)


The Ohio Historical Society has just launched a new website to raise awareness of Ohio’s role in the Civil War: OhioCivilWar150.org. The site features:

  • Digital collections, such as Ohio regimental battle flags
  • A timeline of Civil War events
  • News about upcoming events
  • Discussion forum
  • A section for teachers

I am looking forward to watching this site grow as we get closer to the sesquicentennial in 2011. (Is that really only a little more than a year away?!)

Lincoln Collection at the Allen County Public Library

Ever since the announcement that the documents from the Lincoln Collection at the former Lincoln Museum would move to the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, I’ve been anxious to see just what treasures are in the collection. If the first round of digital images are any indication, the collection is beyond “cool.”

When the Lincoln Museum closed, the Lincoln Financial Foundation gave the artifacts to the Indiana State Museum and the records to the Allen County Public Library. Work has begun on digitizing the records and posting them online. The images that they’ve posted so far are rather tantalizing. My favorite is an undated note written by Lincoln: “Let Master Tad have a Navy sword. A. Lincoln”.

Although not part of the Lincoln Collection, the Genealogy Center at ACPL also has posted an image of a silk ribbon commemorating Lincoln’s death. As they note on the website, it is a rare glimpse into life in Fort Wayne at the time, as the newspapers from April 1865 have been lost.

A recent article in the Journal Gazette has some behind-the-scene photos and more detail about the Lincoln Collection at ACPL. It will be interesting to watch as more and more images are posted on the Lincoln Collection website.

Student History Conference at OSU-Newark Today

I am soooooooo far behind in my blogging that I’ve neglected to mention something I’m very excited about: presenting at the Student History Conference at Ohio State University – Newark today! I’ll be presenting two papers. The first is “For the Benefit of the Private Soldiers: The History of the Grand Army of the Republic in Ohio,” which was my research paper for History 310 (Ohio History) last fall. The second paper is a portion of my senior honors thesis. I’m a bit nervous about that one as (1) so many of my friends have told me they’re going to that session and (2) I’ve had to use just different sections of the thesis because the whole thing it too long to present. I hope what I present makes sense!

If you happen to be in the area this morning, stop by the Reese Center on the OSU-N campus. There are 3 sessions: 9:00, 10:15, and 11:30. There are also two presentations this afternoon: one by a history prof at Denison talking about local history (yea!) and the other by an author talking about historical fiction.

Ohio Historical Society is closed this week

A reminder to everyone that the Ohio Historical Society — including the Archives/Library — is closed today (March 28) through April 3. You can thank the Ohio legislature and their massive slashing of OHS’ budget for this.

Other OHS sites closed this week are:

  • Adena Mansion & Gardens (Chillicothe)
  • Armstrong Air & Space Museum (Waupakoneta)
  • Campus Martius Museum (Marietta)
  • Dunbar House (Dayton)
  • Fort Ancient (Oregonia)
  • Fort Meigs (Perrysburg)
  • Harding Home (Marion)
  • National Afro-American Museum (Wilberforce)
  • National Road/Zane Grey Museum (Zanesville)
  • Piqua Historical Area (Piqua)
  • Serpent Mound (Peebles)
  • Wahkeena Nature Preserve (Lancaster)
  • Youngstown Historical Center of Industry & Labor (Youngstown)
  • Zoar Village (Zoar)

You can read the “Special Notice” on the OHS website:  http://www.ohiohistory.org/sn/010509.html