Tombstone Tuesday: Springtime in the Cemetery

With all of the snow we’ve had this winter — including 6 inches of snow and a half inch of ice we got yesterday and today — I’m in need of some springtime. I took this photo a couple of years ago at Green Lawn Cemetery in Columbus. I hope it brings a bit of springtime to you, too!

Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, 2 April 2007; all rights reserved.

Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, 2 April 2007; all rights reserved.

Tombstone Tuesday: Daniel Lewis, fireman

Capt. Daniel S. Lewis, Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus. Photograph taken by Amy Crow, August 8, 2008. All rights reserved.

Capt. Daniel S. Lewis, Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus. Photograph taken by Amy Crow, August 8, 2008. All rights reserved.

This impressive monument is in Green Lawn Cemetery in Columbus. The imagery on the stone immediately tell you it is the grave of a firefighter — the hydrant with the hose that outlines the stone, a helmet, a ladder, an axe, and a lantern. The inscription reads:

 

In Memory Of

Capt. Daniel S. Lewis

Born May 15, 1854

Entered the Service

Oct. 18, 1881

Gave his life to the city

April 26, 1903

Lewis, captain of Engine Company No. 11,  was killed fighting a fire in the Brunson and Union Company buildings at the corner of Long Street and High Street in downtown Columbus.  According to a newspaper account, he was killed when a wall collapsed and fell on him. “His body was cremated in the ruins.”

“The fire was attended by many exciting incidents, the most thrilling being the rescue of Philip Nation, a grocer, from his apartments on the fourth floor of the Brunson Building where he had been hemmed in by flames. The fire started in the Brunson Building and its progress was fanned by a brisk wind from the north. This building was occupied on the ground floor by the Walkover Shoe Company, Tallmadge Hardware Company, and Bott Brothers’ saloon. The upper floors were occupied mainly as living apartments, the exceptions being the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union rest room and the art studios of Maurice Hague and H. P. Hayden. 

“Smoke was first seen issuing from the basement under the saloon. The fire smoldered for half an hour and the firemen thought they had it under control, when the flames suddenly burst from an upper story”

Source:

The New York Times, April 27, 1903, p. 1. Available online at http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=940DE5DD1F30E733A25754C2A9629C946297D6CF

Tombstone Tuesday: Little Georgie

 

George Blount, Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio

George Blount, Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio

Green Lawn Cemetery in Columbus has innumerable outstanding tombstones. It is one of my favorite places to go when I need either a cemetery or photography “fix.” One of the most photographed tombstones there is that of George Blount.

 

“Little Georgie,” as some refer to him, was the only child of Eli and Sarah Blount. Eli was the owner and proprietor of the American Hotel in downtown Columbus. On 7 February 1873, the family was getting ready to go out and little George, only 5 years old, decided that the fastest way to get downstairs was to slide down the bannister. Sadly, the railing broke and George fell; he died eight days later. 

His tombstone features an almost lifesize likeness. People regularly leave toys at his grave. (If you look closely at the photo, you’ll see some beads given to him last Mardi Gras.) Invariably, someone will dress him in a hat and scarf at Christmas time. It’s almost as if he’s been adopted by countless people in central Ohio.