OhioCivilWar150.org

The Ohio Historical Society has just launched a new website to raise awareness of Ohio’s role in the Civil War: OhioCivilWar150.org. The site features:

  • Digital collections, such as Ohio regimental battle flags
  • A timeline of Civil War events
  • News about upcoming events
  • Discussion forum
  • A section for teachers

I am looking forward to watching this site grow as we get closer to the sesquicentennial in 2011. (Is that really only a little more than a year away?!)

Lincoln Collection at the Allen County Public Library

Ever since the announcement that the documents from the Lincoln Collection at the former Lincoln Museum would move to the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, I’ve been anxious to see just what treasures are in the collection. If the first round of digital images are any indication, the collection is beyond “cool.”

When the Lincoln Museum closed, the Lincoln Financial Foundation gave the artifacts to the Indiana State Museum and the records to the Allen County Public Library. Work has begun on digitizing the records and posting them online. The images that they’ve posted so far are rather tantalizing. My favorite is an undated note written by Lincoln: “Let Master Tad have a Navy sword. A. Lincoln”.

Although not part of the Lincoln Collection, the Genealogy Center at ACPL also has posted an image of a silk ribbon commemorating Lincoln’s death. As they note on the website, it is a rare glimpse into life in Fort Wayne at the time, as the newspapers from April 1865 have been lost.

A recent article in the Journal Gazette has some behind-the-scene photos and more detail about the Lincoln Collection at ACPL. It will be interesting to watch as more and more images are posted on the Lincoln Collection website.

Ohio Tax Records – Digitized and Online for Free

Some Ohio researchers are familiar with FamilySearch’s partnership with the Ohio Genealogical Society to index early Ohio tax records. After countless hundreds of hours of volunteer time, we are seeing the fruits of the labor! The tax records from 1816 – 1838 for Columbiana, Guernsey, Harrison and Jefferson counties are now on the site, fully indexed and linked to the digital image.

Go to http://pilot.familysearch.org, click on the map of the United States, then scroll down to “Ohio Tax Records, 1816-1838.”

Later today, I will work up some more screenshots showing how to navigate the site. Meanwhile, enjoy these early Ohio tax records!

 

Results for John Ramsey in the Ohio Tax Records on FamilySearch.org.

Results for John Ramsey in the Ohio Tax Records on FamilySearch.org.

 

Showing an early Ohio tax record on FamilySearch.org.

Showing an early Ohio tax record on FamilySearch.org.

Summit County, Ohio Probate Records to Go Online

This news was released today by FamilySearch and The Generations Network (owners of Ancestry.com). It will be wonderful for those with ancestors in Akron and Summit County.

Salt Lake City, Utah—Ancestry.com, FamilySearch, and the National Association of Government Archive and Records Administrators (NAGARA) announced on July 24, 2008, that Judge Bill Spicer and the Probate Division of the Summit County Common Pleas Court in Akron, Ohio, were awarded a 2008 grant for the digitization of Summit County marriage, birth, and death records. The court’s grant was one of only two awarded in 2008. This significant grant will make it possible for Summit County to digitally preserve and provide free online access to select historical documents.

The project targets 1840 to 1980 marriage records for over 550,000 individuals, birth records prior to 1908 for over 46,000 individuals, and death records prior to 1908 for over 22,000 individuals. A free, searchable name index linked to the digital images of the original records will be available to the public through the probate court’s Web site www.summitohioprobate.com and the grant partners’ sites.

“As a result of the grant, our Website, which was chosen as one of the 10 best in the country by the National College of Probate Judges, will now have the added distinction of being a model for the state and country for accessing historical court records,” said Judge Spicer. “Not only will it improve access, but by reducing the need to see the often-fragile originals, it will make the court’s job of preserving hundreds of thousands of original records easier. The project is a far-sighted and important effort in preserving local history. On behalf of the court and the citizens of Summit County, I thank the project sponsors for selecting Summit County Probate Court as its 2008 grant recipient.”

This is the first year that this national grant was offered. It is sponsored by Ancestry.com and FamilySearch and administered by NAGARA. Under the grant, FamilySearch will digitize the original documents on-site in the Summit County courthouse by the end of 2008, and Ancestry.com will create an electronic index linked to the images. The entire project is scheduled for completion in 2009. The commercial value of the grant is estimated to be $150,000.00.

Outside of this and similar business transactions, no legal or other affiliation exists between FamilySearch and The Generations Network.

More Records on FamilySearch

According to a press release today from FamilySearch, they’ve added to the records (both indices and images) to the pilot FamilySearch site (http://pilot.familysearch.org). For some time, they’ve had all of the images for the 1850 U.S. census (population schedule). Now the everyname index is 83% complete with the recent addition of Louisiana and Wisconsin. The indexed states are Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Wisconsin and the District of Columbia.

They have also added to the available indexes for the 1850 slave schedules. All of the images for the slave schedules are available for browsing, even for the states that aren’t yet indexed.

It isn’t just U.S. researchers that are benefitting from FamilySearch’s efforts. Among their international records groups are new church records for Mexico, Norway and Spain.

This is such a wonderful time to be a genealogist!