Genealogy Weekly: Masons, Carlisle Indian School, and Civil War Orphans

In this episode of Genealogy Weekly, we covered a resource for Masons in Michigan, two resources for the Carlisle Indian School, and a database for the Ohio Soldiers and Sailors Orphans Home.

Links and show notes are below the video.

Michigan Masons: Deaths

  • From Transactions and Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Free & Accepted Masons of the State of Michigan
  • Indexed by Kris Rzepczynski and available on his site as a PDF
  • Includes entries from Transactions and Proceedings 1930-1938 (deaths 1929-1937). More years will be added
  • Entries include name; date of death; lodge name, number, and location; and year of the Transactions

Carlisle Indian School (starts at 2:53)

Ohio Soldiers and Sailors Orphans Home (starts at 9:26)

  • Compiled by the Greene County Public Library
  • Abstracted from the Applications for Admission
  • One or both parents might still have been alive, just unable to provide for the child
  • Search by surname (rather than full name) to find siblings

You can find past episodes of Genealogy Weekly, along with all of the show notes and links, here.

Genealogy Weekly: Masons, Carlisle Indian School and Civil War Orphans

Exploring the Hidden Features of Ancestry’s New Image Viewer

Ancestry has changed its image viewer. If you’ve a long-time Ancestry user, you might be wondering where some features went. If you’re a new Ancestry user, you might thing the image viewer is a bit lacking. It turns out that some of the most powerful features of the image viewer are hiding behind a simple icon.

If I’m looking at an image like this one for George Nevins, it isn’t immediately obvious what I’m looking at:

Ancestry's Image Viewer

I can see that it’s from the Kansas State Census Collection, 1855-1925, but which year? What county?

Ancestry Image Viewer menu iconThat information (and more besides) is hidden behind one of the icons on the right-hand side of the page. Look below the green “SAVE” button and you’ll see several icons, including one that has a straight vertical line with an arrow pointing left.

When you click that icon, you’ll get an expanded menu with more information and more options. On that expanded menu, you’ll get three tabs:

  • Detail
  • Related
  • Source
Expanded menu on Ancestry Image Viewer

Expanded menu on Ancestry’s Image Viewer

The Detail tab gives the information that was indexed for that record. (Now we can see that this image is from the 1885 Kansas State Census for Scott, Linn County.)

The Related tab has links to other records that Ancestry thinks pertains to that person.

The Source tab includes a source citation, information about where this image came from, and the ability to browse other years and locations in this collection. (The options for browsing vary by collection.)

Ancestry Image Viewer Source tab

Source tab on the expanded menu. The drop-down menus allow you to go quickly to other sections of the collection.

 

Want to be a power user? Sign up HERE to receive a FREE downloadable cheat sheet featuring five more of my favorite tips for getting the most out of Ancestry’s Image Viewer.

 

You can see this in action in the video below:

Do you have other questions about the image viewer or have ideas for other videos or blog posts you’d like to see? Leave a comment!

A Faster, Easier Way to Find Collections on FamilySearch

Have you ever felt like FamilySearch doesn’t really want you to find specific collections or figure out what they have for a certain state? Consider the steps you they point you to taking:

  • Clicking the mapfamilysearch-map1
  • Scrolling through the list
  • Clicking on the state or “Start researching in <x>”

Then you end up at a page where there’s a mishmash of collections that are specific to that state along with nationwide collections. And the image-only collections aren’t even listed with the collections you can search.

Ohio Research Page on FamilySearch

Part of the Ohio Research Page on FamilySearch

There has to be a better way to find collections for a certain state. Guess what — there is.

The Faster, Easier Way

Instead of following the prompt to click on the map, click on the link under the map: “Browse All Published Collections.”

familysearch-map

familysearch-filtersYou’ll get a page that lists all of FamilySearch’s collections. You can use the filters on the left side of the page to narrow down the collections. But an even faster way is to type the name of the state in the box at the top.

FamilySearch includes the name of the state (or the country for non-U.S. collections) in the title of collections that are specific to a location. So when I want to see what they have online for Ohio, all I have to do is type in Ohio in that field.

Instead of a confusing page with all sorts of collections, I have one nice, neat list.

Ohio collections on FamilySearch

You can see the steps in action in this video:

Why You Should Download Your Files From Ancestry and Every Other Website

for-saleNews has been circulating about the possible sale of Ancestry.com. Reaction in the blogosphere and social media has ranged from “Run! The sky is falling!” to “Yawn…” A common theme among many of the posts has been to go download your GEDCOM file — now.

You know what? They’re right. You SHOULD go download your GEDCOM and other files from Ancestry… and any other website where you have them.

Note that I said “download,” not “delete.” It isn’t that I think that Ancestry or any other website is going anywhere. It’s a matter of sensible data management.

Eggs and Baskets

The great thing about electronic files — GEDCOMs, digitized photos, audio files, etc. — is that you can easily have multiple copies of the same data. (It’s also a challenge, but that’s a topic for another post.) When you have multiple copies, you don’t need to have all of your eggs in one virtual basket.

LOCKSS – Lots of Copies Keep Stuff Safe

Lots of Copies Keep Stuff Safe (LOCKSS) is an archival principle that does just what it says. There’s safety in numbers.

One of anything is vulnerable. If that one thing is destroyed or lost, that’s it. It’s gone. With lots of copies, you increase the odds of that item surviving. Losing one doesn’t mean you lose everything.

While I don’t think that a sale of Ancestry would mean the shuttering of the site (I mean, do you pay $2.5B – $3B for something and then shut it down?!), you shouldn’t have the only copy of your files there. You shouldn’t have the only copy of your file anywhere. You shouldn’t have only one copy. Period.

Let’s say that the site where you have your data has trouble with a server; the site is down while they fix it. Your data is inaccessible during that time. Same if you lose your Internet connection. If you can’t reach the web, you can’t reach your data.

And there’s the possibility that the site where you have your data goes out of business.

On the flip side, don’t let your computer store the only copy you have. When that computer dies — and it’s when, not if — you could lose it all. Utilize the Internet as off-site storage.

We Can Play It Safe

Genealogists use many types of data. We have GEDCOMs, photos saved as JPGs and TIFFs, PDFs of family histories. It takes us a long time to compile it all and we don’t want to have to recreate it.

We owe it to ourselves to not have only one copy — not on Ancestry, not on our laptop, not anywhere. When we use the LOCKSS principle, we help ensure that our data lives on.

Locks keep our things secure... and Lots of Copies Keep Stuff Safe

Locks keep our things secure… and Lots of Copies Keep Stuff Safe

Preserving Stories on 1000memories

In the past couple of years, there has been an shifting emphasis in genealogy/family history. Momentum has been building around capturing not only the names, dates, and places — the cold, hard facts — about our ancestors, but also capturing their story. As Lisa Alzo put it in her presentation on writing your family history at the recent Federation of Genealogical Societies conference, “You may have a family tree as long as this hall, but what do you know about any of those ancestors?” Curt Witcher talked about the importance of story in his keynote at RootsTech 2011. It’s the story that engages people.

In this day and age of Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Skype, and texting, it’s easier than ever before to share our stories. But how do we preserve them?

That’s where a new website called 1000memories comes in.

At 1000memories, the emphasis in on sharing and preserving stories of ourselves and our ancestors. It’s a place “to remember everyone,” as co-founder Jonathan Good describes it. It’s free to register and free to use. If you can type, you can post photos, stories, documents, sound clips, movies — anything that will tell a bit about who that person was.

You might be thinking, “Hey, I can do that on my blog or on Facebook. Why do I need 1000memories?” Unlike your blog or Facebook, 1000memories is working to preserve the material forever. (And as Prince sang, that’s a mighty long time.) They’re serious about this. 1000memories takes extraordinary measures to keep these materials safe. (One thing that isn’t mentioned on that page is their partnership with Internet Archives, the group that gives us the awesome Wayback Machine among all sort of other preserved digital material. I told you — these folks are serious!)

So how easy is it to share photos and stories? At the FGS conference, I stopped by the booth for a brief demo. I had not tried to post anything prior to talking with Michael Katchen, so I was starting from square one. Michael showed me how to login via Facebook, which took all of about 10 seconds. I could see all of my Facebook albums. All I had to do was choose which album and then click the photos I wanted to import into 1000memories. I chose this photo of my grandparents:

Grandma and Grandpa Johnson, Easter 1965

Within a couple minutes, I had imported that photo, created a page for Grandma, a page for Grandpa, and started the frame of a family tree. It really is that easy. I was hooked. That afternoon, I skipped sessions at the conference, and went back to my room so I could upload more photos from my laptop. I added more photos, and typed up a quick story about my great-uncle Harold.

Since then, I’ve gone back through some older family photos that had just vague identifications on them. “Great-Grandma Young and her children.” Considering that she had 10 children, I needed some help on the specifics. I emailed the photo to my Dad and he identified everyone. I cannot wait to get more photos and more stories uploaded.

The top part of the page I created for my grandma.

Pages can have different privacy levels. For example, you can make pages for deceased family members open to everyone (only registered users can add to or edit the page) , but set pages for living people so that only invited people can share content or even set it so only invited people can view the page.

1000memories makes it so easy. All of my cousins can go on any of the pages I’ve created and add their own photos and stories. I’m the youngest of the grandchildren, and I know that my stories of Grandma and Grandpa aren’t the same as those of my older cousins. Now we have a way for all of our stories to be shared and preserved.

I plan on writing more about 1000memories in the near future. But the site is so easy to use, you really don’t need a lot of tutorials to get started!

Learn more:
Michael Katchen of 1000memories will be a guest on GeneaBloggers Radio this evening at 10:00 Eastern.

You can also watch co-founder Jonathan Good’s presentation at the 2011 TEDxSF.


Disclaimer: I attended the “Engaging Your Family in Genealogy” breakfast panel at the FGS conference. However, I can honestly say that the free (small) glass of orange juice and the rather dry cheese danish did not influence this review.