Tombstone Tuesday: John Coble, “a lovely bud so young and fair”

John C. Coble tombstone, Asbury Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo taken by Amy Crow 9 June 2009; all rights reserved.

John C. Coble tombstone, Asbury Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo taken by Amy Crow 9 June 2009; all rights reserved.

This tombstone is in Asbury Cemetery in Madison Township, Franklin County, Ohio, near the intersection of Noe-Bixby Road and Winchester Pike. It is in excellent condition. I love the epitaph.

“In
memory of
John C.
Son of John and
Jane Coble.
born Augt 3th 1838.
died Septr. 17th 1840.
aged 2 years,
1 month and 14 days.
This lovely bud so young
and fair,
Called hence by early doom
Just came to show how
sweet a flower
In paradise would bloom.”

Tombstone Tuesday: Springtime in the Cemetery

With all of the snow we’ve had this winter — including 6 inches of snow and a half inch of ice we got yesterday and today — I’m in need of some springtime. I took this photo a couple of years ago at Green Lawn Cemetery in Columbus. I hope it brings a bit of springtime to you, too!

Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, 2 April 2007; all rights reserved.

Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, 2 April 2007; all rights reserved.

Tombstone Tuesday: Need a mirror

When I went to Georgetown, Kentucky back in September 2007, I did what I usually do when I go to a new location: scout out the local cemeteries :) Maplegrove Cemetery in Georgetown is a small, modest, somewhat overgrown cemetery tucked behind a Pizza Hut and a gas station.

This tombstone for Eliza Washington is made from concrete. My best guess is that the person who made it poured the concrete into a box form, then set in stencils for the letters (like kids used to do with potatoes). The tombstone maker forgot (or didn’t realize) that the stencils had to be set backwards so they would appear correctly on the marker. (Again, this is just my best guess.)

I did find a 20-year-old Eliza Washington in the 1910 census for Scott County, Kentucky, but I’m not certain it is the same person.

Text:
Eliza
Washi-
ngton
born
July. 7
184 [9?] 5[?]
died
May. 8
1912

Need a mirror...

Tombstone Tuesday: Indianapolis Typographical Union

Julie Cahill Tarr, the Chicagoland Graveyard Rabbit, posted a photo of  the Chicago Typographical Union Memorial in Elmwood Park Cemetery, River Grove Illinois. It reminded that I found a similar monument a few years ago in Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis, Indiana (one of my favorite cemeteries).

Indianapolis Typographical Union monument, Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Indiana. Photo by Amy Crow, taken 27 September 2004, all rights reserved.

Indianapolis Typographical Union monument, Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Indiana. Photo by Amy Crow, taken 27 September 2004, all rights reserved.

 According to The Encyclopedia of Indianapolis, the National Typographical Union was formed in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1852. Journeymen printers from fourteen cities were represented; the group from Indianapolis was selected as Union No. 1 “through a random drawing.” The Union later became the International Typographical Union following the admission of Canadian unions in 1869.(1)

J. . E. Puhl marker, Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Indiana; photo taken by Amy Crow, 27 Sept 2004, all rights reserved.

J. E. Puhl marker, Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Indiana; photo taken by Amy Crow, 27 Sept 2004, all rights reserved.

Surrounding the monument are 13 smaller markers: (2)

  • S. H. Hill, 1874
  • W. Spooner, 1875
  • Unknown, 1876
  • ___ Lee, 1876
  • C. Gildricht, 1881
  • J. B. Smith, 1880
  • J. Sexton, 1905
  • J. E. Puhl, 1881
  • W. B. Montgomery, 1890
  • J. Wilson, 1885
  • B. E. Dolbear, 1887
  • Mrs. B. E. Dolbear, 1887
  • D. Mitten, 1887

Sources:

(1) Cunningham, Joan. “International Typographical Union.” In The Encyclopedia of Indianapolis, edited by David J. Bodenhamer and Robert Graham Barrows, 823-824. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1994. 

(2) Crow, Amy. Photographs taken at Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Indiana, 27 September 2004.

Tombstone Tuesday: Woody Hayes

In honor of this Saturday’s Ohio State/Michigan game (the greatest rivalry in college football!), I’m featuring the grave of legendary OSU football Woody Hayes. Woody and his wife Anne are buried in Union Cemetery in Columbus, not far from the OSU campus.

Although he will always be known for being the coach of the Buckeyes, Woody was also an incredible history buff. He also served in the U.S. Navy in World War II and left the service with the rank of lieutenant commander. An excellent biography of Woody Hayes can be found on the WOSU-TV website.

 

Wayne Woodrow "Woody" Hayes, Union Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, 29 August 2008, all rights reserved.

Wayne Woodrow (Woody) Hayes, Union Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, 29 August 2008, all rights reserved.

The verse reads:

“And in the night of death, hope sees a star
and listening love hears the rustle of a wing.”